Top 10 Things to Do in Nashville

Ryman

Ryman Auditorium

There's no better place to start absorbing Nashville's musical heritage than the Ryman Auditorium. It's no longer home to the Grand Ole Opry, but the auditorium continues to host contemporary acts like Trace Adkins, Blake Shelton and Luke Combs. Recent visitors suggest opting for a tour to get a behind-the-scenes glimpse of the legendary music venue. Sit in on the "Soul of Nashville" screening for a multidimensional experience that uses archival images and footage of performers from the Ryman's past to illustrate its role in music history. Plus, you can learn about the auditorium's backstory with its "Workin' on a Building" exhibit, which displays artifacts from the Ryman's construction. What's more, you can test out your own pipes at the Ryman's recording studio and record a CD to take home as a souvenir.

Parthenon

The Parthenon

Nashville is a city of many nicknames; most of them have to do with music. Still, the city is also known as the "Athens of the South" thanks to the numerous higher education institutions established there. This identity is realized with the construction of the Parthenon, a full-scale replica of the one found in Athens, Greece. Although the Parthenon was only meant to be temporary – it was built for the Tennessee Centennial Exposition in 1897 – it has since become a beloved attraction, housing models of the statues found in the original structure as well as an impressive art collection. Recent visitors praised the well-kept grounds, peaceful atmosphere and magnificent building, recommending an evening visit to see it illuminated. Others rave about the surrounding green space, which is free to access and great for picnicking. However, parents warn that kids' attention can quickly wane.

Cheekwood

Cheekwood Estates & Gardens

Art aficionados and nature lovers alike should plan on making a stop at the Cheekwood Estate & Gardens. With its greenhouses, sculpture trail and chromatic flower display, the 55-acre Botanical Garden offers sanctuary from downtown's bustle. The on-site art museum is just as beautiful: Housed in the original Georgian-style Cheek family mansion at the heart of the grounds, the museum boasts an impressive collection of 19th- and 20th-century American art, as well as antique furniture, temporary exhibitions and artifacts from around the world.

Tootsie's

Tootsie’s Orchid Lounge

After a day exploring the roots of the "Country Music Capital of the World," why not experience the sounds of Music City first-hand? If you're looking for an authentic atmosphere with top-notch performances, Tootsie's "World Famous" Orchid Lounge is the place to go. Since the days when the Grand Ole Opry still sought refuge at the Ryman Auditorium, this downtown bar has been featuring performances by both world-renowned and up-and-coming artists.

Johnny Cash museum

The Johnny Cash Museum

Uncover the enigma behind The Man in Black with a visit to The Johnny Cash Museum. The museum, which opened in April 2013, boasts the world's largest collection of Johnny Cash artifacts and memorabilia, including films, handwritten notes and letters penned by Cash himself along with more than 25 costumes made famous during the music legend's career. Exhibits spotlight different periods in Cash's life, including his years in the Air Force, his marriage to June Carter and his famous prison concert tour. Since the museum is officially endorsed by the Cash family, you can bet you'll stumble across other personal mementos not available to the public anywhere else, like a stone wall excavated from Johnny and June's Hendersonville Lake House that's been repurposed into one of the exhibits

Hall of Fame Records

Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum

Music and history lovers can mix and mingle over the exhibits found at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum. Peruse the plaques dedicated to country music's finest – from Patsy Cline to Johnny Cash – and walk among artifacts like Jimmie Rodgers' guitar and Elvis Presley's solid gold Cadillac limo. If you have time, stop to browse the two-story wall plastered with every gold and platinum country record produced, and then head to Studio B. One of the world's most influential recording studios and a Music Row Landmark, Studio B produced more than 35,000 songs by legends like Dolly Parton, Waylon Jennings and Roy Orbison. For an interactive history lesson on the roots and evolution of country music, take a self-guided walk through the "Sing Me Back Home: A Journey Through Country Music" exhibit, which spans two floors of the museum.

Grand Ole Opry

Grand Ole Opry

It was this radio show, which began broadcasting in the 1920s, that put Nashville on the map as the "Country Music Capital of the World." Although its venue has changed over the years, the Grand Ole Opry continues to host top country performers like Brad Paisley, Carrie Underwood and Keith Urban. And a trip to Nashville isn't complete without stopping by the Grand Ole Opry House for a tour to look back through the ages. Get a behind-the-scenes look one of three ways: with a daytime backstage tour, a post-show tour or a VIP tour. During a daytime tour, your guide will share stories of music legends who have walked the venue's hallowed halls, show you photos from the Opry's venerated history and possibly bring you on to the iconic stage. Recent visitors were very pleased with the tours, noting the guides were energetic and offered many fun facts about the institution.

Hermitage

The Hermitage

Constructed in 1821 for President Andrew Jackson, this Greek Revival mansion now stands as a National Historic Landmark and a preserved window into the president's home life. Most of us may be familiar with Jackson from his role in the War of 1812, his stint as president and his appearance on the $20 bill, but a tour of the 1,000-acre estate provides a more up-close-and-personal look. Along the guided tour you'll see the main house, the kitchen, an original log cabin, Jackson's tomb and the Old Hermitage Church. Another popular exhibit tells the story of the 150 slaves that worked on the grounds from 1804 to 1865.Travelers said the tour of the property was educational, engaging and informative, adding it's well worth the entry fee.

Belle Meade Plantation

Belle Meade Plantation

Constructed in 1853 in a breathtaking Greek Revival style, the Belle Meade Plantation is known as the "Queen of the Tennessee Plantations." At the center of the plantation is the mansion (its columns are peppered with bullet holes from the Civil War), where guides dressed in period costumes offer tours of the mansion's antebellum-style interior. You're invited to explore the grounds, which are home to the country's first and best thoroughbred breeding farms (the visitor center is modeled after a traditional Southern paddock) as well as the renowned Iroquois Steeplechase, the oldest in the United States. During the summer and fall, the Belle Meade Plantation hosts numerous events, including Easter egg hunts and antique auctions.

Nashville Visitor Center

Discover Nashville

Give your legs a break on this Nashville tour that takes you through the city—and past its most famous sights—by a comfortable coach bus. Not only will you see more Nashville attractions in less time than if you were walking, but admission to the Ryman Auditorium and the Country Music Hall of Fame is included. It’s a perfect introduction to Nashville for first-time visitors.


music city map

Printable Nashville Dining and Entertainment Map

Nashville is a city of music, dining and entertainment. Take the opportunity to fully explore experience this lively, growing city.
  

Map of Nashville: Dining & Entertainment

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